Saturday, March 6, 2021

NGC 7129. reflection nebula

NGC 7129 (also known as Cr 441, OCL 240, and LBN 497) is a reflection nebula, located at a distance of around 3,750 light years in the constellation of Cepheus.
The nebula is illuminated by a group of stars that belong in a young stellar cluster, which emanated from a large molecular cloud. The latter consists of three smaller clouds, which are known as Lynds 1181, Lynds 1183, and TDS 395. The dominant stars in the cluster are: a B3-type star known as BD+65°1638, a B3e-type known as BD+65°1637, a B5e-type star known as SVS 13, and a Herbig B8e-type known as LkH╬▒ 234. 
Furthermore, a cavity that is around three light years across, exists on Lynds 1181. This was formed due to the stellar winds and ultraviolet emission of the young B-type stars that are present there.
Star formation is still active in the region as observations have shown. Strong evidence for this is the presence of numerous Herbig-Haro objects, two large molecular outflows, embedded infrared sources, and the nebulous filaments of the region. 
Image: Composite infrared image of NGC 7129 taken with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The image was created using broadband filters. Here emission at 3.6 micrometers is shown in blue, 4.5 microns in green, 5.8 microns in orange and 8.0 microns in red. If the nebula was visible to the naked eye, it would be four times smaller than the full Moon. The reddish color is due to dust reflection within the nebula. Responsible for this are the stars that are embedded in it. The young stars in the nebula produce jets that heat up the gas in their immediate environment. Thus, due to this we can observe in green color emission from the carbon monoxide molecules, that are present at the southern part of the nebula. If you look you at the image, you may notice that the deposition of dust particles and the carbon monoxide gas form a structure that resembles a rose.
Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Caltech/Harvard-Smithsonian CfA

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